G.fast Applications
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BROAD USES FOR G.FAST

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MULTI-DWELLING UNITS (MDU)

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SINGLE FAMILY HOUSES

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SMALL CELL BACKHAUL

MULTI-DWELLING UNITS (MDU)

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For most service providers, MDU environments are a big challenge. In many apartment buildings, it is too expensive to drop fiber all the way to the end dwelling. Dealing with right-of-way issues, regulatory issues, take rate issues and more make MDUs problematic at best. 

 

A better approach is to use the existing copper wiring. This allows for a faster ROI and lower initial capitalization. Plus, it avoids potential regulatory issues regarding where the demarcation exists between the service provider and the property owner.

 

G.fast is the perfect solution because it combines state-of-the-art noise cancelling vectoring as well as the highest bandwidth to deliver the lowest cost per Mbps delivered.

SINGLE FAMILY UNITS

No customer has ever claimed they have too much bandwidth. The opposite is clearly true – there is tremendous demand for broadband and this demand will continue well into the future. Nielsen’s Law predicts bandwidth will grow 57x in the next decade. The question is how will telco’s afford to deliver such performance economically?

This is as true in residential neighborhoods as it is in multi-dwelling environments. The main difference is the infrastructure.  For single family units, the distribution point is typically outside the building in a pedestal, in the ground or on a pole.

Instead of trenching ditches through consumer’s yards or requiring lengthy in-home installations, the service provider connects the DPU to an optical network and then connects to the existing phone line that transmits the signal to the residence.

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MOBILE BACKHAUL

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Mobile is huge. Ericsson predicts that In 2016, there are expected to be over 8 billion mobile devices and by 2020, it may grow to over 50 billion. This is going to create a massive amount of traffic. According to Cisco, traffic will grow from 2.6EB/month today to 15.9EB/month in 2018 – in only 4 short years.

 

So, simply asked, “how will all this data get there?” Is there enough cell tower capacity? Can it all be backhauled? As congestion on mobile towers grows, the need to off-load traffic to smaller and smaller cells becomes increasingly important. This is especially true because over 70% of all mobile traffic is generated indoors – where typical backhaul technologies are ineffective.

 

Microcells and picocells are excellent technologies to deliver the tower capabilities. Yet, backhauling the traffic from the microcell or picocell then becomes the bottleneck. This is where G.fast comes in. With G.fast, it is possible to leverage the existing copper wiring inside a home or building and achieve high upstream performance – all at a very low cost to deploy. Mobile backhaul is particularly relevant for MDU environments where running fiber inside the building is so problematic.

 

The Sckipio G.fast solutions are designed to meet the needs of mobile backhaul. The Sckipio chips includes support for time-of-day (ToD) synchronization to external clock reference, synchronization using low accuracy management protocol IEEE 1588 and one PPS signal, and 8KHz Network Time Reference support between the DPU and CPE.